• STUDIO PASS

    Pâté en Croûte

  • STUDIO PASS

    Precision Italian Beef

  • STUDIO PASS

    Italian Sandwich Rolls

  • STUDIO PASS

    Roasted Sweet Pepper Giardiniera

  • STUDIO PASS

    Dirty Fried Rice

  • STUDIO PASS

    Cheddar-Tasso Hush Puppies With Apple Honey

  • STUDIO PASS

    The Choose-Your-Own-Adventure Muffin

  • STUDIO PASS

    Ultimate Double-Chocolate Muffins

  • STUDIO PASS

    Ultimate Banana-Nut Muffins

  • STUDIO PASS

    Christmas Pudding







Hainanese Chicken Rice
  • Hainanese Chicken Rice

    Hainanese Chicken Rice


    Timing

    16 hrs total; 1 hr 30 min active

    Yield

    4 to 6 servings


    Hainanese chicken rice is just poached chicken and rice, and yet it’s one of the most iconic dishes in the world. It illustrates how a seemingly simple preparation can be refined into a meal that’s a perfect expression of a single ingredient: poached chicken, served with rice that’s been cooked in the poaching broth. The broth is also seasoned and served with the chicken and rice for sipping, along with a couple of dipping sauces that keep every bite interesting. The key to its preparation is a three-step poaching method that yields an attractive appearance, tender and silky meat, and, most importantly, a unique “bite” to the skin, one of the most prized parts of the dish. The skin is rubbed with salt to remove any imperfections; the whole bird is blanched to shrink-wrap the skin around the flesh; and it’s placed in an ice bath after poaching. Our one addition to the method is a dry brine, which, while unconventional, yields evenly seasoned meat and provides a buffer against overcooking, as slightly cured meat has a better water-holding capacity. The chicken is the star, but the poaching broth and the rice are important supporting players. Granulated chicken bouillon provides a glutamate boost to the broth, and fragrant pandan leaves add intoxicating notes of vanilla and coconut to the broth and rice while also bringing out some of jasmine rice’s inherent aromatic complexity. Served with a spicy and acidic fresh chile-garlic sauce and [link https://www.chefsteps.com/activities/ginger-scallion-sauce classic ginger-scallion sauce], every bite is grab-bag of texture and flavor.
  • Thai-Style Steamed Fish With Garlic and Lime (Pla Gapong Neung Manao)

    Thai-Style Steamed Fish With Garlic and Lime (Pla Gapong Neung Manao)


    Timing

    40 min total; 20 min active

    Yield

    4 servings


    Pla gapong neung manao is a classic Thai dish consisting of steamed fish served in an acidic broth with lots of minced garlic and fresh chiles. It’s as easy to prepare as it is impressive to serve and tasty to eat. The fish is scored, stuffed with lemongrass, gently steamed, and typically served in a fish-shaped heated serving platter with a chamber that can accommodate hot coals or a can of Sterno so the dish is bubbling hot when it's served. The fish is doused in a cooked sauce made with lime juice, minced garlic, sliced shallots, and vibrant chiles. Garnished with a tangle of fresh cilantro, it's an incredibly aromatic and beautiful centerpiece to a meal. The heated serving platter intensifies the aroma of the fish and its broth, but it’s entirely optional—just make sure you use a serving platter that can accommodate all of the broth. I like to shingle thin slices of lime over the top of the fish, because it looks nice and adds an extra aromatic bump from the oils in the lime zest, but that, too, is optional. Be sure to pile the minced garlic, chiles, and sliced shallots high on top of the fish before adding the cilantro. Pla gapong neung manao may be a simple dish, but it’s a classic for a reason. A bit of tender fish, scooped up with some of the deliciously sour broth, bits of minced garlic, chiles, threads of shallots, and cilantro, paired with steamed jasmine rice ... it’s the perfect bite: salty, aromatic, sour, spicy, bitter, and just a little sweet.
  • Ultimate Peking Duck

    Ultimate Peking Duck


    Timing

    5 days total; 4 hrs active

    Yield

    4 servings


    Imagine the best Peking Duck you’ve ever had. That crispy, amber-toned skin. That juicy, melt-in-your-mouth breast meat. Those deeply nuanced, deeply aromatic flavors, expertly engineered to send your pleasure sensors a-spinnin’. Now imagine you made that duck—and at home. Sound like a stretch? We get it. Topping last-meal lists the world over, this legendary Chinese dish—famously favored by such boldface dignitaries as Henry Kissinger, Yasser Arafat, and Fidel Castro—is complex and showy. **So complex and showy, in fact, that we often assume it’s outside the purview of home cooks.** But while Peking Duck is mind-alteringly delicious enough to build lasting bridges between one-time geopolitical adversaries, it’s also just something people cook for dinner. And trust us, we’re not just blowing air between your skin and your back meat when we say it’s something you can make for dinner. We’re going to show you how. But before we do, let’s get our proverbial ducks in a row: it ain’t gonna be easy, and it ain’t gonna be quick. Your kids may ask why you cleared all their Go-Gurts and juice boxes out of the fridge. Your neighbor may inquire about how that air compressor got from her garage shelf to your kitchen counter. And your significant other may well wonder about an Amazon email ensuring a bucket of maltose is on its way. The trick—as with many challenging yet rewarding tasks—is to break the process down into clear steps, patiently moving through each until you arrive at the finish. And oh, what a finish: **we’ll show you how to carve your bird in the manner of the best Chinese restaurants**, making the most of every morsel. So when you serve that cracklin’ duck alongside paper-thin pancakes or pillowy steamed buns, your guests will have the very special pleasure of feasting on one of the world’s great foods. But if you’re anything like us, your sense of satisfaction will come way before the heaping platter hits the table. It’ll come when you head out to the Chinese grocer to procure your bird and when you gather your tools—brush, tweezers, a blowtorch if you’ve got one. It’ll come again when you stealthily sneak into the Johnsons’ garage to relieve them (temporarily!) of that aforementioned air compressor and yet again when you bathe your long-necked buddy in a spice-laced poaching tea. Secure in the knowledge that your duck will be delicious, you can garner satisfaction at every step along the way—the satisfaction that comes from making something rather than simply ordering it. From exceeding your own expectations. And from doing something not because you have to, but because it feels freaking great to feed people an amazing dinner you made your own self. When it all comes together and you’re pinching that first crispy bit between chopsticks, **we predict you’ll feel like you can achieve most anything**. And as far as extraordinary food is concerned, that may well be true. But let’s leave the high-stakes feats of diplomacy to the pros.
  • How to Make Shanghai Soup Dumplings, with Andrea Nguyen

    Shanghai Soup Dumplings With Andrea Nguyen


    Timing

    About 3 hrs

    Yield

    24 dumplings


    Tender, porky filling. Rich, ginger-laced broth. Paper-thin dough pleated into pretty little purses. If there’s a better one-bite dish than Shanghai-style soup dumplings, we’d like to try that, please. Author and culinary instructor Andrea Nguyen, who wrote a whole book about dumplings, has been making dough-wrapped snacklets since she was a kid. Yet she still marvels at the ingenuity of the nineteenth-century cooks who formed the very first xiao long bao, or Shanghai-style soup dumpling. The cooks’ impressive innovation: make a rich broth, then turn that broth into little gelatinous cubes. Wrap those jelly cubes, along with filling, in some dough, and then steam the whole shebang in a bamboo basket. Steaming the dumplings melts the gelatin, returning the broth to a liquid state. And there it is: a soul-warming, soupy satchel that captivates all who have the pleasure of eating it. Xiao long bao are a signature dish of Shanghai, where locals judge them by a few key factors. First, the filling must be plentiful and delicious, so use meat fatty enough to melt in your mouth; lean pork is a no-no. Second, there should be lots of soup that really sings with flavor; a very viscous pork stock is traditional, but it’s easier to get terrific results with chicken stock and gelatin. This frees you up to concentrate on the trickiest bit: the dough should be thin enough that it almost seems to dissolve as you bite, yet it must be strong enough to hold the hot soup right up to the moment of truth. And now, with Nguyen’s guidance, you are going to make xiao long bao yourself. If you don’t have a bamboo steaming basket, invest in one now. They are inexpensive, and you can serve the dumplings right up in there. And if you’re inviting friends over to share your pork-stuffed treats, plan to make a lot. These little dumplings disappear quickly. *OTHER PEOPLE’S IDEAS: A New Series from ChefSteps
    At ChefSteps, we love to cook. And we love to share our top tips and techniques with you. But we’re not the boss of everything, and we learn from our friends and colleagues every day. That’s why we created Other People’s Ideas, a new series starring our favorite subject experts. These talented folks are here to help you tackle everything from soup dumplings to pizza pie—and have a ton of fun along the way. You down with OPI? Yeah you are. Let’s do this.*
  • Char Siu: Tender, Cantonese-Style Barbecued Pork

    Char Siu: Tender, Cantonese-Style Barbecued Pork


    Timing

    9 hrs total; 1 hr active

    Yield

    Tasty pork for about 6 people


    Char siu is an ancient Cantonese pork-roasting technique featuring long strips of meat marinated in a spicy-sweet sauce. It’s a common cold-case item in Asian supermarkets, but this version blows that clamshell-encased piggy right out of the water. Think tender, melt-in-your-mouth meat, slowly cooked sous vide to develop incredible flavor and texture, then quickly finished on the grill for a hit of smoke and char. We tend to mix up our own marinades in the ChefSteps kitchen, but we were such fans of the results we got with Lee Kum Kee’s Char Siu Sauce that we decided a little shortcut was in order. Keep a bottle of that delicious stuff on hand, and you will have **a foolproof centerpiece dish that requires very little effort** but will still be the star of the potluck, book club gathering, or tailgate. Stress-free *and* totally tasty? See, this is why we fell in love with the whole sous vide thing in the first place.
  • Soft, Airy Chinese Steamed Buns: Simplified

    Soft, Airy Chinese Steamed Buns


    Timing

    About 2 hr active; 3.5 hr total

    Yield

    About 24 buns / 1 loaf / a butt ton of green onion rolls


    Steamed buns: pockets of steamy goodness, just waiting for you to fill them with tender meats, pickled vegetables, fresh herbs, and ooey-gooey sauces. While the Chinese have been making mantou—steamed bread dough—forever, America’s obsession with the buns can be credited to David Chang. The Momofuku magnate is pretty modest about the whole thing, however; in the cookbook named for his restaurant, Chang puts it this way: “They’re just our take on a pretty common Asian food formula: steamed bread + tasty meat = good eating.” When Nick Gavin set out to make a ChefSteps version of steamed buns, he started with Chang’s recipe. Through dozens of trials, he found ways to simplify steps for home cooks, eventually winding up with the recipe here—an assiduously tested path to perfect little Chinese-style taco shells in which to stick your favorite [link /activities/stupidly-simple-sous-vide-pork-belly pork belly], [link /activities/smokerless-smoked-chicken smoky chicken], or marinated tofu. But true to form, Nick didn’t stop there. Inspired by the super-simple, airy dough, he conjured up **two bonus treats**, **both designed for dipping into your favorite sauces**—think hoisin and hot mustard, chive oil and [link /activities/japanese-kewpie-style-mayo Kewpie mayo]. Ready to follow in his steamy footsteps? Start by making steamed bun magic, then move on to the bread and rolls. Or skip all that and dream up a brand-new destiny for *mantou*, sprung directly from your imagination. The sky’s the limit, as they say, and that sky is full of fluffy, delicious *mantou* clouds.
  • Beef Chow Fun

    Beef Chow Fun


    Timing

    20 min total; 10 min active

    Yield

    4 servings


    The true test of any Cantonese restaurant is its beef chow fun. It has to be seasoned properly, the beef has to be tender, the noodles need to be slightly chewy, and—above all—it has to have the right amount of wok hei, the smoky, singed quality of properly stir-fried food. This recipe gets you restaurant-caliber beef chow fun at home. The most important part is using [link https://www.chefsteps.com/activities/hor-fun-noodles fresh, homemade hor fun], since the noodles are long, elastic, and nicely chewy even after saucing and getting tossed around the wok. Store-bought noodles won’t give you the same results, and making them yourself gives you a leg up on most restaurants. And the classic technique of using baking soda to marinate the beef makes it tender and improves [link https://www.chefsteps.com/activities/mastering-the-maillard-reaction Maillard browning]. Ultimately, the success of this dish is dependent on proper stir-frying technique and producing wok hei, which is very difficult if you don’t have a burner with enough heat output to ignite aerosolized oil as you toss your food. If you’re using a wok on a relatively weak home stovetop burner, you have to focus on cooking in small batches to maintain a high enough heat to properly sear the ingredients without letting them steam. If you’re committed to leveling up your wok hei game and have outdoor space, cooking on a high-output outdoor wok burner is the way to go, but it’s cooking at warp speed—you have to work quickly and efficiently, toeing the line between perfectly cooked and straight up burnt. It takes practice, but once you get it down, you’ll be rewarded with real deal beef chow fun: tender-crisp vegetables; deeply browned beef; chewy, sauce-slicked noodles; and the intoxicating aromas and flavors of wok hei.
  • Tasty, Tender Baby Bok Choy

    Tasty, Tender Baby Bok Choy


    Timing

    30 min

    Yield

    A perfect side for 4 people


    Mild with a hint of pepper, baby bok choy makes a great side dish for stir-fry while also balancing out rich, meaty fare like braised short rib or sous vide pork belly. What a versatile little sonuvagun! With Joule and a vacuum sealer, you can retain the vegetable’s fresh flavor while achieving a nice texture. This is tried-and-true, never mushy, totally tender bok choy.
  • Steamy-Hot Sexy Whole Fish in 5 Minutes—It’s Microwave Magic

    Steamy-Hot Sexy Whole Fish in 5 Minutes


    Timing

    20 minutes active time

    Yield

    1-2 servings


    You put a whole fish in the microwave?! Blasphemy! What has the world come to? Really, ChefSteps? Take a breath. Let us explain. The microwave can be a tool for quick reheats of leftovers. sure. But if you know how to cook, the microwave can truly be a great cooking tool. When you score a whole fish, flavor it, and wrap it in plastic wrap, you are setting up a steaming station. This is akin to the technique called en papillote, which means wrapping a fish in parchment paper, furling it tight at the top, and baking it in the oven for awhile. You can also steam a whole fish in a steamer pot you have to buy specifically for that purpose. All three techniques yield a tender flesh on the fish. However, which one is faster in producing perfectly cooked fish, light and bright with herbs and spices, steamed in a pillow of aroma in 5 minutes? The microwave! Which of those three techniques requires the fewest gadgets and therefore fewer dishes to wash afterwards? That's right—the microwave. Don't be put off by the idea of steaming a whole fish and settle for fillets instead. Steaming the entire fish helps keep the flavor and moisture from the bones, the head, and the skin. All of these parts contribute to flavor and moisture in the form of fat and dissolved collagen. So be daring! Buy a whole fish. Follow this recipe. Steam it in the microwave. Dinner in less than five minutes. Daring is rarely this delicious.
  • How to Make Fresh Yuba

    How to Make Fresh Yuba


    Timing

    12 hrs total; 5 hrs active

    Yield

    6 to 8 yuba sheets


    Yuba—aka fu pei, tofu skin, or bean curd skin—is the foundation of several classic dishes throughout Asia, from Cantonese dim sum like fried bean curd skin rolls to the more elemental presentations of Japanese Buddhist cooking, like yuba braised in dashi. Yuba can be eaten fresh, fried, boiled, and even dried. The process for making yuba is relatively straightforward but requires a lot of technique and patience. Soy milk is heated until a “skin”—a creamy yellow, protein-lipid film that’s produced through a combination of protein coagulation and drying—forms on the surface. The thin tofu skin is carefully harvested repeatedly using a long bamboo skewer or dowel, and it’s either eaten immediately or hung to air-dry for longer-term storage. These days, most people get their yuba at the store, where it’s sold as semi-dry sheets, dried sticks, or as dried chips. And while you can’t beat that kind of convenience, the flavor of store-bought yuba pales in comparison to freshly made yuba, particularly yuba made from fresh soy milk made with good soybeans. Yuba makers use giant steam tables to heat large pans of soy milk, harvesting four to eight giant sheets at a time. Since the optimal temperature for film-forming is relatively low (it starts at [c 80] and maxes out at around [c 88]), the gentle heat from these steam tables is ideal. When making yuba at home, the best cooking method is also the simplest: Heat soy milk in a large nonstick skillet—the larger, the better—over direct heat until a skin forms, then carefully remove the yuba sheet with a wooden dowel and hang it to dry. Unlike more unwieldy techniques involving double boilers and steaming in hotel or sheet pans, this method allows you to reasonably control the temperature within a range, and the nonstick coating makes it easy to harvest sheets that form on the surface, as well as scrape off and remove any excess coagulated soy milk (called “amayuba,” or sweet yuba) from the bottom of the pan throughout the process. Beyond the little details, the key to this recipe is time. This process takes hours and can take a whole day if you’re trying to make a substantial quantity of yuba. But for the patient, the payoff is yuba that tastes better, is more aromatic, and silkier than any you could buy in a store.
  • Silky Seitan and Vegetable Stir-Fry

    Silky Seitan and Vegetable Stir-Fry


    Timing

    30 min total; 20 min active

    Yield

    4 servings


    When you make seitan from scratch, a byproduct of the process is a slurry of wheat starch and water. There are a lot of things you can do with the starch slurry: You can make noodles with it or whip up a batter. Or you can use it to thicken sauces in seconds. Using a starch slurry to thicken sauces to a spoon-coating consistency right at the end of cooking is quite common in Chinese cuisine. Typically cornstarch or potato starch is used, but the same principles that apply to a cornstarch or potato starch slurry also apply to a wheat starch slurry. The only trick to using the runoff from making seitan for thickening is getting an appropriately high concentration of starch. Letting the runoff sit undisturbed for at least six hours will give the starch time to settle at the bottom of the container, and you can easily ladle off most of the clear water on top. Of course, you can make this recipe using another starch slurry. And while this recipe also calls for a batch of seitan, you can substitute tofu, tempeh, or even shrimp for the wheat meat. But using seitan and the starch slurry leftover from its production is a kind of total utilization that’s kind of neat, and it’s a great argument for making seitan at home.
  • Char Siu-Style Pork Tenderloin, With Chef Gregory Gourdet

    Char Siu-Style Pork Tenderloin, With Chef Gregory Gourdet


    Timing

    1 hr 45 min

    Yield

    6 servings


    This dish is inspired by Chef Gregory Gourdet’s childhood memories of eating char siu pork from Chinese takeout restaurants. To make his spin on the purplish classic, grab a pork tenderloin—one of the easiest cuts to work with in all of Meatdom—make a simple marinade, cook your tenderloin with Joule, and finally give it a quick spin on a hot grill to develop a char on the outside. Then it’s onto the table for a seriously delicious upgrade to a beloved classic.



Meet our chefs
Grant Crilly

Grant Crilly

Grant Crilly is the Executive Director and cofounder of ChefSteps. Grant is a classically trained chef and, prior to ChefSteps, he worked on the award-winning cookbook series Modernist Cuisine and cooked at various restaurants, including L’Astrance in Paris, Busaba in Mumbai, and Mistral Kitchen in Seattle.