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Want more amazing sous vide recipes?

Enroll in Cooking Sous Vide: Beyond the Basics.

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{"activity_order":null,"activity_type":["Science"],"assignment_recipes":null,"author_notes":null,"cooked_this":0,"created_at":"2014-06-26T21:35:30Z","creator":null,"currently_editing_user":null,"description":"[fetchTool egg_timer]\n<br>\n<h2>Visual Doneness for Eggs</h2>\nWhen it comes to cooking (or anything, really), what could be more empowering than the knowledge that your efforts will yield awesome results? It's part of our core philosophy at ChefSteps that using superior predictive tools\u2014in combination with great techniques and recipes\u2014will help us all become better cooks. We're throwing serious brain power behind that belief, and it's with considerable excitement that we introduce you to our very first effort: a predictive calculator that allows you to precisely control the texture of your sous vide eggs. Developed by mathematician (and recent ChefSteps hire) Douglas Baldwin, the Egg Calculator gives a precise temperature and time for slow-cooking eggs, with consistent results\u2014a job no egg timer can do.\n\nBaldwin, the author of the indispensable [link http://www.douglasbaldwin.com/sous-vide.html <i>Sous Vide for the Home Cook</i>], was an early adopter to sous vide cooking, and over time has become one of the foremost experts on the subject. In the glory days of the sprawling culinary forum eGullet (see links under \"Further Reading\"), he was a sous vide guru to countless curious cooks, generously sharing his pioneering time-and-temperature tables, food safety tips, and other insights. Now, Douglas brings his mathematical muscle to predictive-cooking projects that promise to revolutionize the way we cook.\n\nLet's be clear: This new tool is only possible thanks to the groundbreaking egg-viscosity work of food scientist C\u00e9sar Vega (more on that later). And simple as it looks, it took serious mathematics, not to mention some seriously messy viscosity trials, to develop a technology that allows users to achieve eggs of any desired texture. Want fudgy yolks and runny whites? Runny yolks and custard-like whites? Jammy yolks and tender whites? Whatever you're after, this tool can help you achieve it by determining the precise time and temperature to make your perfect consistency happen. **Below, we've shared the full story behind this exciting new invention,** so sit down and have a read if you like. Then get ready to cook up some killer eggs.","difficulty":"","featured_image_id":"{\"url\":\"https://www.filepicker.io/api/file/g31NFxl2S1WXS1XFYAtm\",\"filename\":\"egg-calc-gallery.jpg\",\"mimetype\":\"image/jpeg\",\"size\":77632,\"key\":\"9Hs9RZBQwCZP0YHrI8gG_egg-calc-gallery.jpg\",\"container\":\"chefsteps-production\",\"isWriteable\":true}","first_published_at":"2014-07-08T23:03:45Z","forks":[],"id":4172,"image_id":"{\"url\":\"https://www.filepicker.io/api/file/ybgAAVFYQZamHV45Bm8D\",\"filename\":\"egg-calc-hero-4a.jpg\",\"mimetype\":\"image/jpeg\",\"size\":97640,\"key\":\"8OAru7vUScKiA1BEFTjp_egg-calc-hero-4a.jpg\",\"container\":\"chefsteps-production\",\"isWriteable\":true}","include_in_gallery":true,"last_edited_by_id":1730,"likes_count":621,"premium":false,"published":true,"published_at":"2014-07-08T23:03:45Z","short_description":"With sous vide, it's easy to get eggs exactly how you like them. Use our Egg Calculator to find your perfect egg.","slug":"the-egg-calculator","source_activity_id":null,"source_type":0,"summary_tweet":"","timing":"","title":"The Egg Calculator","transcript":null,"updated_at":"2016-04-19T18:27:22Z","upload_count":7,"used_in":[],"vimeo_id":"","yield":"","youtube_id":"","tags":[{"id":33,"name":"sous vide","taggings_count":258},{"id":1322,"name":"predictive cooking","taggings_count":1}],"equipment":[],"ingredients":[],"steps":[{"activity_id":4172,"audio_clip":null,"audio_title":null,"created_at":"2014-07-10T16:38:30Z","directions":null,"extra":null,"hide_number":true,"id":113225,"image_description":null,"image_id":null,"is_aside":null,"presentation_hints":{"aside_position":"left"},"step_order":0,"subrecipe_title":null,"title":"##Egg Textures:<br>The Road to Prediction","transcript":null,"updated_at":"2016-04-19T18:27:22Z","vimeo_id":null,"youtube_id":null,"ingredients":[]},{"activity_id":4172,"audio_clip":null,"audio_title":null,"created_at":"2014-07-10T16:38:30Z","directions":"<b>1</b> If you are chilling it in ice water (rather than serving immediately), do so for at least eight minutes to ensure that the yolk doesn't continue thickening due to \"carry-over cooking.\"\n<br>\n<br>\n<b>2</b> If you reheat the egg, heat it to between [c 55]\u2013[c 60]. This will ensure your yolk thickens very slowly while keeping your egg safe and tasty.","extra":null,"hide_number":null,"id":113226,"image_description":null,"image_id":null,"is_aside":true,"presentation_hints":{"aside_position":"left"},"step_order":1,"subrecipe_title":null,"title":"Two things to remember when creating your perfect egg:","transcript":null,"updated_at":"2016-04-19T18:27:22Z","vimeo_id":null,"youtube_id":null,"ingredients":[]},{"activity_id":4172,"audio_clip":null,"audio_title":null,"created_at":"2014-07-10T16:38:30Z","directions":"In the United States, there are three consumer grades for eggs: AA, A, and B\u2014grade As are the ones you\u2019re most likely to run across in the grocery aisle. Eggs are graded based on the interior quality of the egg, plus the appearance and condition of the shell. Eggs of any quality grade will differ in weight and size. This tool works for grades AA or A.\n\nHere\u2019s how they break down: \n\n**U.S. Grade AA**: Whites are firm and thick, while yolks are round, and nearly free of defect. These eggs have clean, uniform shells.\n\n**U.S. Grade A**: Whites are \u201creasonably\u201d firm and the yolks are, again, practically free of defect, while the shells are clean and uniform. \n\n**U.S. Grade B**: The whites of grade B eggs are often thinner and the yolks tend to be wider and flatter. The shells can be lightly stained. \n\nYou won't find Grade B eggs at fancy grocery stores\u2014though they do show up at discount food shops\u2014and you can\u2019t use them with our egg tool. Or, rather, you <i>can</i>, but your results won't be as reliable due to the smaller amount of protein in these eggs. \nTo learn more about the grading system, check out this [link http://www.ams.usda.gov/AMSv1.0/getfile?dDocName=STELDEV3022056 useful USDA document], which we consulted to create the sidebar you have just now finished reading.","extra":null,"hide_number":true,"id":113227,"image_description":null,"image_id":"{\"url\":\"https://www.filepicker.io/api/file/TwwVmIJORu2Tp3ortkpL\",\"filename\":\"MK3_9341.jpg\",\"mimetype\":\"image/jpeg\",\"size\":2034170,\"key\":\"vH0EpErSMWjC07iNagaY_MK3_9341.jpg\",\"container\":\"chefsteps-production\",\"isWriteable\":true}","is_aside":true,"presentation_hints":{"aside_position":"left"},"step_order":2,"subrecipe_title":null,"title":"Grades matter","transcript":null,"updated_at":"2016-04-19T18:27:22Z","vimeo_id":null,"youtube_id":null,"ingredients":[]},{"activity_id":4172,"audio_clip":null,"audio_title":null,"created_at":"2014-07-10T16:38:30Z","directions":"Everyone has an opinion about eggs. Sit them down at a diner, and even the most indifferent eaters will debate whether eggs taste best scrambled or rolled up in an omelette, soft-boiled or poached, fried over-easy or sunny side up. And while eggs are among the most common, least expensive, and best-loved foods in the world, cooking them properly can be a confounding exercise. The tricky part comes in achieving desirable textures in both the yolk\u2014which contains vitamins, minerals, and a good amount of fat and protein\u2014and the whites\u2014which are made mostly of water, plus some proteins and tiny amounts of minerals, fatty acids, and glucose. When heated, the whites will set first. The yolk, meanwhile, gels softly, becoming more and more firm as it heats. \n\nOver the centuries, cooks have found many ways to work around this textural conundrum, but consistency has always been an issue. A breakthrough came in the early aughts, when Parisian food chemist Herv\u00e9 This (pronounced \u201cTiss\u201d) popularized the 65 \u00b0C egg. Cooked slowly at that temperature, the egg\u2019s whites have coagulated but the yolk has not\u2014so that the former have a smooth, custardy appearance, and the latter is soft but not runny. Once the internal temperature of the egg reached that of the surrounding water, argued This, the cooking time did not further impact the texture of the egg\u2014it would be the same after, say, four hours at 65 degrees Celsius as it was after one. Eggs cooked to around 65 degrees soon started showing up at high-end restaurants all over the world. Wylie Dufresne uses a 64-degree egg to create his deconstructed [link http://www.nytimes.com/2008/03/05/dining/reviews/05rest.html?pagewanted=all&_r=1& Eggs Benedict], for instance. Order a Caesar salad at Lunchbox, Bryan Voltaggio's casual sandwich spot in Frederick, Maryland, and it will arrive with a hen's egg cooked precisely at <i>63</i> degrees. It seems that every chef has a very particular favorite temperature for slow-cooked eggs.\n\nIn 2011, an article appeared in the journal <i>Food Biophysics</i> that debunked the notion that prolonged cooking wouldn't impact the egg's textures. Its author, food scientist C\u00e9sar Vega, tested sixty-six different time-temperature combinations to discover whether even small variations in cook time would impact viscosity. His findings revealed that, in fact, the viscosity of an egg yolk increased linearly with time\u2014meaning that it is possible to <i>predict</i> the texture of the egg based on temperature and time. To make this information useful to chefs, Vega offered qualitative comparisons for the viscosity of eggs cooked at various times and temperatures, to the viscosities of common foods\u2014from fluffy whipping cream all the way to Marmite, the gravelly yeast spread New Zealanders eat on toast. Chefs could use those tools to customize the viscosity of their eggs more precisely than ever before.","extra":null,"hide_number":true,"id":113228,"image_description":null,"image_id":"{\"url\":\"https://www.filepicker.io/api/file/Po0BK1x7STK7XzlpEs1p\",\"filename\":\"MK3_9368.jpg\",\"mimetype\":\"image/jpeg\",\"size\":1149891,\"key\":\"BDdDg7qKTYy1aqvpbwPl_MK3_9368.jpg\",\"container\":\"chefsteps-production\",\"isWriteable\":true}","is_aside":null,"presentation_hints":{"aside_position":"left"},"step_order":3,"subrecipe_title":null,"title":"The Egg Conundrum: Early Developments","transcript":null,"updated_at":"2016-04-19T18:27:22Z","vimeo_id":null,"youtube_id":null,"ingredients":[]},{"activity_id":4172,"audio_clip":null,"audio_title":null,"created_at":"2014-07-10T16:38:30Z","directions":"Douglas Baldwin's first experiments with egg textures began back in the eGullet days, when he developed tables to help forum members who weren't satisfied with the yolk and white textures they were getting using slow-cooking methods. The tables were helpful, and he saw potential for further development in the field of predictive cooking.\n\nTo create a truly predictive algorithm, Douglas first turned to the numerical heating model he'd developed that used mathematical methods similar to those he'd employed to model shock waves for his PhD thesis. Baldwin says previous heating models he'd seen assumed the surface temperature of the egg was equal to the surface temperature of the bath. In fact, it takes time for surface to come up to temperature of the water bath, which Baldwin\u2019s numerical scheme takes into account. It also accounts for whether you\u2019re cooking your egg with an immersion circulator\u2014in which the water moves around as the egg cooks\u2014or using a Sous Vide Supreme or pot on the stove\u2014in which the water is relatively still. \n\nOnce he had a good heating model, Baldwin set about figuring out how to quantitatively determine the viscosity of the egg yolks in a mathematically precise manner. Inspired by Vega\u2019s landmark research, he determined a viscosity scale using foods like Hershey\u2019s syrup, ready-made frosting, and pudding. Then, he cooked 18 large grade-AA, 12 jumbo grade-AA, and 12 medium grade-AA eggs at different times and temperatures, and, using his fingers, compared the viscosities.\n\nTrials completed (and kitchen cleaned), Baldwin had an algorithm that could tell users the <i>precise</i> time and temperature to cook an egg in order to achieve the exact yolk and white textures they desired. But it occurred to him: What would users do with the egg once it was cooked? Would they take it out of the water right away and eat? Would they plunge it into an ice bath and then leave it there for a few minutes? Even in the ice bath, he knew, the egg would continue to cook for a while. So he developed a way to adjust the time and temperature to account for this difference. \n\nEnter ChefSteps. Like Douglas Baldwin and C\u00e9sar Vega, we spend a lot of our time thinking about how to account for the non-linear way that heat behaves in the kitchen. In fact, we're completely fascinated by the complexities of heat transfer, and a little obsessed with finding ways to simplify them for everyday cooks. Our team of scientists, software engineers, designers, and chefs teamed up with Douglas to apply his intricate algorithms to a simple, user-friendly web app. We filmed hundreds of outcomes and implemented them in a visual interface for a two-step \"calculator\" (with three supplementary steps for fine-tuning), and voil\u00e0: the ChefSteps Egg Calculator was born. The app will adjust time and temperature depending on how you want your egg, and\u2014talk about worry-free cooking\u2014whether you want to serve it now or later.\n\nSo grab a dozen eggs and start playing around with this new tool. We can't wait to hear what you think.","extra":null,"hide_number":true,"id":113229,"image_description":null,"image_id":"{\"url\":\"https://www.filepicker.io/api/file/HP2CZsZTSze5MvfOeiHL\",\"filename\":\"MK3_9369.jpg\",\"mimetype\":\"image/jpeg\",\"size\":1329468,\"key\":\"Sq9Z1VYtRUaAVwRHTPv4_MK3_9369.jpg\",\"container\":\"chefsteps-production\",\"isWriteable\":true}","is_aside":null,"presentation_hints":{"aside_position":"left"},"step_order":4,"subrecipe_title":null,"title":"The ChefSteps Egg Calculator","transcript":null,"updated_at":"2016-04-19T18:27:22Z","vimeo_id":null,"youtube_id":null,"ingredients":[]},{"activity_id":4172,"audio_clip":null,"audio_title":null,"created_at":"2014-07-10T16:38:30Z","directions":"There are actually two parts to an egg white, and often the outer white\u2014the section outside the egg-white membrane\u2014won't fully coagulate during cooking. Most of us like our eggs free of watery, goopy bits, which the slots in the spoon drain out handily. Simply lift your slow-cooked egg with a slotted spoon, drain the unwanted bits, and serve.","extra":null,"hide_number":true,"id":113230,"image_description":"Slotted Spoon","image_id":"{\"url\":\"https://www.filepicker.io/api/file/QtMKu17eTOOvFKpQ1Nu7\",\"filename\":\"SPOON.jpg\",\"mimetype\":\"image/jpeg\",\"size\":3734933,\"key\":\"I0mbz9nZRyiDHW93Mkz3_SPOON.jpg\",\"container\":\"chefsteps-production\",\"isWriteable\":true}","is_aside":true,"presentation_hints":{"aside_position":"left"},"step_order":5,"subrecipe_title":null,"title":"Chef's Tip:<br> Use a Slotted Spoon","transcript":null,"updated_at":"2016-04-19T18:27:22Z","vimeo_id":null,"youtube_id":null,"ingredients":[]},{"activity_id":4172,"audio_clip":null,"audio_title":null,"created_at":"2014-07-10T16:38:30Z","directions":"Our work on the Egg Calculator is just one contribution to the growing field of predictive cooking. We're already hard at work on other solutions for predictive algorithms, but here are some researchers who are doing important work on the egg. \n\nOur pal Kenji over at Serious Eats has an [link http://www.seriouseats.com/2013/10/sous-vide-101-all-about-eggs.html in-depth article] on slow-cooked eggs, with photographs that show their viscocities at various times and temperatures. \n\nRead about the groundbreaking egg-related research that C\u00e9sar Vega and co-author Ruben Mercad\u00e9-Prieto published in [link http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11483-010-9200-1 <i>Food Biophysics</i>], or pick up a copy of [link http://www.amazon.com/The-Kitchen-Laboratory-Reflections-Perspectives/dp/0231153449 <i>The Kitchen as Laboratory: Reflections on the Science of Food and Cooking</i>], edited by C\u00e9sar Vega, Job Ubbink, and Erik van der Linden.\n\nThis well-read [link http://blog.khymos.org/2009/04/09/towards-the-perfect-soft-boiled-egg/ 2009 blog post] from Martin Lersch offers lots of insights into the science and history of developing the perfect soft-boiled egg. The article introduced many chefs and scientists to Vega's work. \n\nTo check out Douglas's groundbreaking eGullet work, start with the [link http://douglasbaldwin.com/sous-vide.html#Figure_4.1 \"egg matrix,\"] move on to his [link http://egullet.org/p1778348 initial egg calculations], then move on to his improved calculations\u2014found [link http://egullet.org/p1783864 here] and [link http://egullet.org/p1910741 here].\n\nOur friends Alex and Aki at [link http://blog.ideasinfood.com Ideas In Food] have also worked tirelessly to perfect sous vide eggs, including a [c 75] 13-minute egg in their first cookbook.","extra":null,"hide_number":true,"id":113231,"image_description":null,"image_id":null,"is_aside":null,"presentation_hints":{"aside_position":"left"},"step_order":6,"subrecipe_title":null,"title":"##Further Reading","transcript":null,"updated_at":"2016-04-19T18:27:22Z","vimeo_id":null,"youtube_id":null,"ingredients":[]},{"activity_id":4172,"audio_clip":null,"audio_title":null,"created_at":"2014-07-10T16:38:30Z","directions":"[fetchActivity 75-c-egg]\n\n[fetchActivity hazelnut-ragout-pappardelle]\n\n[fetchActivity perfect-yolks]\n\n[fetchActivity carrots-and-perfect-yolk]\n\n[fetchActivity hollandaise]","extra":null,"hide_number":true,"id":113232,"image_description":null,"image_id":null,"is_aside":false,"presentation_hints":{"aside_position":"left","width":"wide"},"step_order":7,"subrecipe_title":null,"title":"##Get Inspired:<br>Other Sous Vide Egg Ideas","transcript":null,"updated_at":"2016-04-19T18:27:22Z","vimeo_id":null,"youtube_id":null,"ingredients":[]}]}

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